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Regent Parking – Should I Pay or Appeal? 2022 Laws

HomePrivate Parking FinesParking TicketsRegent Parking – Should I Pay or Appeal? 2022 Laws
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What is Regent Parking and do you have to pay their fines? We’ve taken a long hard look at Regent Parking fines so you’re in the know. Discover the different options to deal with a Regent Parking fine below. 

Do You Have to Pay?

In many circumstances, parking tickets are not enforceable.

It’s a bit sneaky, but last time I had a parking fine, I paid £5 for a trial to chat with an online solicitor.

Not only did I save £50 on solicitor fees, I also won my case and didn’t have to pay my £271 fine.

You can try it out now, just remember to cancel the trial once you’ve got your answer.

Who are Regent Parking?

Regent Parking is a car park management service provider which helps clients become independent of their services within 18 months

They provide an array of services that are designed to assist private businesses to manage their car parks in line with legislation. But they also aim to help the clients to become independent of their services over time. 

Some of the car park management services they offer include consultations, signage, CCTV and parking ticket enforcement. The company is a recognised member of the International Parking Community (IPC).

What is a Regent Parking fine?

As part of Regent Parking’s services, they help their clients to prevent car parking abuse, such as:

  1. Drivers not paying for parking when they’re supposed to
  2. Drivers staying parked for longer than they paid for
  3. Drivers parking in places within the car park which aren’t parking bays

They prevent this by issuing private parking tickets, formally called Parking Charge Notices or PCNs. These shouldn’t be confused with Penalty Charge Notices from a local authority. 

The Parking Charge Notice can be left on your vehicle for when you return, which usually happens if the car park has on-site staff. But the ticket can be sent to the vehicle keeper in the post. Regent Parking gets the keeper’s address from the DVLA, which they’re allowed to do due to their IPC accreditation. 

How much is a Regent Parking fine?

Regent Parking fines are capped by the law – and these laws are changing. At current, Regent Parking can serve PCNs to drivers asking them to pay up to £100. But they must deduct at least 40% if the driver pays the parking ticket within 14 days. 

The new laws which are due to come into effect in 2023 will reduce the maximum amount drivers can be fined. Regent Parking and other private firms will only be able to issue PCNs for up to £50 in the majority of cases

Do I have to pay a Regent Parking fine?

You might have to pay a Regent Parking fine to avoid court action and further expenses. But the answer isn’t so straightforward. 

First of all, we should say that Regent Parking is allowed to issue private parking tickets when a motorist doesn’t pay or overstays. This is because every motorist who uses one of their car parks agrees to the terms and conditions by entering, as stated by Regent Parking signage. 

The confusion comes about when you learn what Parking Charge Notices really are. You might think they’re a real fine, but they’re not. They’re actually seen to be like an invoice. This invoice is for the service you received at the car park, which has been inflated for breaching the terms and conditions you agreed to by using the car park.

Invoices can be enforced if the claimant takes the other person to court. So, for you to be made to pay a Parking Charge Notice, Regent Parking will need to initiate litigation and win.

Will Regent Parking take you to court?

Maybe.

Regent Parking might take you to court but they also might not. There’s no way of knowing what they will do. And for that reason, it’s risky to assume they won’t and you’ll get off the hook. 

You might read advice online telling you to ignore the Parking Charge Notice. There have been instances when people ignore these parking tickets and never get taken to court. But it’s not always the case. 

You are likely to receive a Letter Before Action in any case. This letter threatens legal action against you if you don’t pay. It could be a real legal threat, or it could be a scare tactic sent to make you give in and pay. 

So, should you pay a Regent Parking fine?

You should pay a Regent Parking fine if you want to guarantee that you won’t be taken to court. There is also the option of appealing the Regent Parking fine if you think they have unfairly served you the PCN. 

How do you appeal to Regent Parking?

You can appeal a Regent Parking fine within 28 days of the alleged parking breach by emailing your appeal to appeals@paymypcn.net. 

Your appeal should include one or more reasons why you think the parking ticket is unjust. You may need to supply evidence to back up your claims when the existing evidence doesn’t support your arguments. 

The appeal will be responded to within 56 days, telling you that the appeal has been successful and you don’t have to pay, or that your appeal was declined. If you don’t receive a response within 56 days, the appeal is automatically accepted and the parking ticket is withdrawn. 

Do You Have to Pay?

In many circumstances parking tickets are not enforceable.

It’s a bit sneaky, but last time I had a parking fine, I paid £5 for a trial to chat to an online solicitor.

Not only did I save £50 on solicitor fees, I also won my case and didn’t have to pay my £271 fine.

You can try it out now, just remember to cancel the trial once you’ve got your answer.

GET STARTED

Regent Parking appeal rejected!

If your Regent Parking appeal gets rejected but you don’t agree, you can take the appeal further. This time you can appeal to an independent group which will make the final decision. There might be a deadline to escalate the appeal, typically up to one year. 

Regent Parking will explain how to progress your appeal within their rejection letter or email. As they’re accredited members of the IPC, they will direct you to the Independent Appeals Service (IAS). 

Regent Parking fines – pay or appeal?

Only you can make the final decision o pay or appeal. Hopefully, the information above can help you make that decision, but factor in the strength of any appeal and the evidence you have to support it.

When you decide to pay, it’s best to pay within 14 days to save money by paying the discounted fine.

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