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Can Bailiffs Take My Car for a Parking Fine?

Scott Nelson Profile Picture Janine Marsh Profile Picture
By
Scott
Scott Nelson Profile Picture

Scott Nelson

Managing Director

MoneyNerd’s founder, Scott Nelson, has a decade of financial industry experience, including 6 years in FCA regulated loan and credit card companies. Troubled by a lack of conscience in the industry, he founded MoneyNerd to give genuine advice to those in debt and struggling financially.

Learn more about Scott
&
Janine
Janine Marsh Profile Picture

Janine Marsh

Financial Expert

Janine Marsh is an award-winning presenter and a valuable member of the MoneyNerd team. With a wealth of experience as a financial expert, she's been featured on BBC Radio 4, BBC Local Radio, and BBC Five Live, and is a regular on Co-op Radio.

Learn more about Janine
· Feb 7th, 2024
Fight back against parking tickets with JustAnswer, get legal guidance now!

In partnership with Just Answer.

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Bailiffs Take My Car for Parking Fine

Have you received a private parking fine and feel unsure about what to do next? You’ve come to the right place. Every month, over 130,000 people visit our website to understand more about fines and parking tickets.

In this article, we’ll provide clear and simple advice on:

  •  What happens if you don’t pay a parking fine.
  •  If you need to pay your parking fine.
  •  When and why bailiffs might be used by the council or car park operator.
  •  How to keep your car safe from bailiffs.
  •  Ways to stop bailiffs from taking your car.

We understand how annoying it can be to receive a private parking fine. Don’t worry, we have lots of helpful advice and examples to guide you through the process.

56% of Ticket Appeals Succeed

In some circumstances, you might have a legitimate reason not to pay your parking fine.

It’s a bit sneaky, but the last time I needed legal advice, I paid £5 for a trial to chat with an online solicitor called JustAnswer.

Not only did I save £50 on solicitor feeds, I also won my case and didn’t have to pay my £271 fine.

Chat below to get started with JustAnswer

*According to Martin Lewis, 56% of people who try to appeal their ticket are successful and get the charge overturned, so it’s well worth a try. In partnership with Just Answer.

Can a bailiff take my car for a parking fine?

Technically, a bailiff can seize a vehicle for an unpaid parking fine when you’re subject to a court order to pay. But they will try to get a cash payment from you first, and may target other assets before your vehicle. 

We discuss more on this shortly. 

Will a bailiff take my car for a parking fine?

Although bailiffs can take your car for a parking fine, they might not do so. The total of a parking fine plus bailiff fees is often much smaller than the value of most vehicles, so they might target other assets if you don’t pay in cash. 

Baliffs may prefer to seize electrical goods, such as TVs, laptops and games consoles before they attempt to clamp and seize your car. But this isn’t guaranteed. 

» TAKE ACTION NOW: Get legal support from JustAnswer

Can a debt collector take my car?

No, a debt collector cannot take your car or any of your assets. A private car park operator may use a debt collection agency to chase an unpaid parking fine. These companies aren’t bailiffs and don’t have any legal powers that the car park company does. It’s simply an outsourcing relationship of convenience for the car park company.

Successful Appeal Case Study

Situation

Initial Fine £100
Additional Fees £171
Total Fine £271

The Appeal Process

Scott used JustAnswer, online legal service to enhance his appeal. The trial of this cost him just £5.

Total Fine £271
Cost of legal advice £5

JustAnswer helped Scott craft the best appeal possible and he was able to win his case.

Scott’s fine was cancelled and he only paid £5 for the legal help.

Get started

In partnership with Just Answer.

When can a bailiff not take my car?

Bailiffs cannot seize a vehicle that is:

  1. Used as your home, such as a campervan
  2. A mobility vehicle or has a Blue Badge
  3. Used for work and valued below £1,350

How to stop bailiffs taking your car

Bailiffs can clamp and seize a vehicle that is on your driveway or on a public road. But they cannot enter a locked garage or other people’s property to clamp or take the vehicle. Therefore, if you want to stop a bailiff from taking your car, you could:

  1. Put the vehicle in a locked garage
  2. Ask a friend or family member to leave it on their property

You should do this if you know they’re coming to visit you, such as after receiving a Notice of Enforcement and not clearing the debt within seven days. 

Hire a Parking Solicitor for less than a coffee.

If you’re thinking about appealing your parking ticket then getting some professional advice is a good idea.

Getting the support of a Solicitor can make your appeal much more likely to win.

For a £5 trial, Solicitors from JustAnswer can look at your case and help you create an airtight appeal.

Try it below

Get started

In partnership with Just Answer.

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The authors
Scott Nelson Profile Picture
Author
MoneyNerd’s founder, Scott Nelson, has a decade of financial industry experience, including 6 years in FCA regulated loan and credit card companies. Troubled by a lack of conscience in the industry, he founded MoneyNerd to give genuine advice to those in debt and struggling financially.
Janine Marsh Profile Picture
Appeals Expert
Janine Marsh is an award-winning presenter and a valuable member of the MoneyNerd team. With a wealth of experience as a financial expert, she's been featured on BBC Radio 4, BBC Local Radio, and BBC Five Live, and is a regular on Co-op Radio.