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Is There a Fine for Parking on Double Yellow Lines? 2022

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Is there a fine for parking on double yellow lines? And if so, how much is the fine for parking on double yellow lines? These are just some of the questions we’ll be asking and answering here. Read on for clear answers to common motorist questions.

Do You Have to Pay?

In many circumstances, parking tickets are not enforceable.

It’s a bit sneaky, but last time I had a parking fine, I paid £5 for a trial to chat with an online solicitor.

Not only did I save £50 on solicitor fees, I also won my case and didn’t have to pay my £271 fine.

You can try it out now, just remember to cancel the trial once you’ve got your answer.

What is the rule for double yellow lines?

The Highway Code states that you must not stop and wait or park on double yellow lines. This is the case even when there aren’t any further signs telling you not to stop or park. Specifically, the Highway Code states that double yellow lines “indicate a prohibition of waiting at any time even if there are no upright signs”.

However, there are two exceptions to this rule:

  1. There might be times when you can stop briefly to unload a vehicle
  2. Blue Badge holders can often park on single or double yellow lines for up to three hours

You will need to check local signs and markings to see if you can quickly stop and unload. A pair of lines over the edge of the kerb indicates that you cannot stop to unload. Moreover, even Blue Badge holders cannot park where loading restrictions are in place. 

Can you be fined for parking on double yellow lines?

Because you’re not supposed to stop or park on double yellow lines, you can be issued a fine for doing so

These fines can be hefty so you’ll want to avoid getting one. You won’t be fined for parking on double yellow lines if you meet one of the exceptions mentioned above. 

Who can fine you for parking on double yellow lines?

You’re most likely to be fined by the local council for parking on double yellow lines when not permitted, which is in most cases for most drivers. 

What happens if you get caught parked on double yellow lines?

The local council can issue you with a Penalty Charge Notice for the parking contravention. These might be sent in the post, but they’re most likely to be served to you in person. 

A council parking warden, officially known as a Civil Enforcement Officer (CEO) will leave the council parking ticket on your vehicle’s windshield. You’ll have up to 28 days to pay the parking fine, and if you don’t, you’ll be sent a charge certificate which increases the fine by 50% of its value. 

You could also be served with a Fixed Penalty Notice by a police officer. These are different to Penalty Charge Notices. They offer you the chance to accept a fine instead of going to the Magistrates’ Court over the matter. 

How much is the fine for parking on double yellow lines?

Penalty Charge Notices can cost the motorist anywhere between £50 and £80 depending on location and the seriousness of the offence. Councils typically see parking on double yellow lines as a more serious offence, compared to running out of time on paid-for parking. 

Therefore you can expect to pay the higher end of these fines. But the fine can be halved if you agree to pay within 14 days. This means you could end up paying around £40 instead of £80. But remember, if you don’t pay within 28 days the fine is increased by 50%, meaning you could end up paying £120.

And if you don\t pay the increased fine within 14 additional days, the council can ask for a court order that makes you responsible to pay or face debt enforcement action, such as bailiffs. Things can get a lot more expensive at this stage. 

Is parking on double yellow lines a criminal offence?

You won’t get a criminal record or points on your license when you are served with a Penalty Charge Notice. Therefore, parking on double yellow lines isn’t a criminal offence. 

Can you appeal a double yellow line fine?

You can legally challenge a Penalty Charge Notice within 28 days of it being served, which is the same amount of time you’re given to pay. But if you’re going to pay, make sure to do it within 14 days to take advantage of the discounted rate. 

You’ll need to appeal with a good reason why the PCN should be withdrawn. For example, you might tell them that your car was broken down. But this would then need to be backed up with evidence, such as a report or invoice from a mechanic. 

There isn’t a formal appeals process against a Fixed Penalty Notice. 

Can you park on single yellow lines?

Single yellow lines indicate that parking is only allowed during certain hours of the day. 

There will be an upright sign on the road with a single yellow line. This sign should state at which times of the day you’re allowed to park on the single yellow line. These times of the day are likely to be early mornings, late evenings and possibly weekends. 

There is no set time that is used throughout the UK, so you’ll have to pay attention to the roadside sign in your location. 

Is there a fine for parking on double yellow lines? (Quick recap)

Parking or waiting on double yellow lines is prohibited in most cases for most people. The most common exception is for Blue Badge holders, who can often park on single or double yellow lines for up to three hours. 

To stop people from parking on double yellow lines you can be fined. A council parking warden might issue you with a Penalty Charge Notice, or a police officer could issue you with a Fixed Penalty Notice. 

The cost of these fines differs and only a Penalty Charge Notice has a set appeals process. If you disagree with a Fixed Penalty Notice you may have to attend the Magistrates’ Court.

Do You Have to Pay?

In many circumstances parking tickets are not enforceable.

It’s a bit sneaky, but last time I had a parking fine, I paid £5 for a trial to chat to an online solicitor.

Not only did I save £50 on solicitor fees, I also won my case and didn’t have to pay my £271 fine.

You can try it out now, just remember to cancel the trial once you’ve got your answer.

GET STARTED

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