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Parking Control Management – Pay or Appeal

parking control management

For free and impartial money advice and guidance, visit MoneyHelper, to help you make the most of your money.

Did you get a Parking Control Management ticket, and are you thinking about appealing it? There are times when you can challenge a Parking Charge Notice and times when you have to pay it. Private operators like Parking Control Management have the right to issue fines. But they are not the same as Penalty Charge Notices (PCNs), which councils and the Police can give.

A Parking Charge Notice is an invoice that landowners and operators give to motorists. In this post, I look at when you could appeal a ticket and when you might have to pay. Read on to find out more on whether to pay or appeal a ticket issued by Parking Control Management.

Do You Have to Pay?

In many circumstances parking tickets are not enforceable.

It’s a bit sneaky, but last time I had a parking fine, I paid £5 for a trial to chat to an online solicitor.

Not only did I save £50 on solicitor fees, I also won my case and didn’t have to pay my £271 fine.

You can try it out now, just remember to cancel the trial once you’ve got your answer.

Can a parking ticket be enforced on private land?

An operator or landowner can issue a Parking Charge Notice when you park on their land and don’t obey the rules. However, they can issue fines for minor infractions, leading to disputes. The tickets issued may resemble Penalty Charge Notices, but they are not the same.

A Parking Charge Notice is an invoice raised by a private firm against a motorist who is deemed to have broken its ‘rules’. They are not enforceable by law. An operator has to start legal proceedings against you to recover any money owed.

In short, it is a civil matter between the operator and you. Therefore, a Parking Charge Notice is enforceable when a judge orders you to pay the fine.

Sometimes, it is not economically viable for an operator to take you to court. Still, there is never any guarantee they won’t!

My advice is not to ignore a Parking Charge Notice or any correspondence you receive. It is wiser to deal with the problem whether you choose to pay the fine or file an informal appeal. When you file an appeal with the operator, they cannot start proceedings against you until they reject it. Then you have the option to file an appeal with an independent appeals service.

Why you could get a Parking Charge Notice

Private landowners and operators must abide by the Code of Practice if they are members of the British Parking Association (BPA). When they do not, and you receive a Parking Charge Notice, you have the right to contest the fine.

You could receive a parking fine on private land if you:

  • Don’t pay
  • Overstay the time you are allotted
  • Didn’t park correctly in an allocated bay
  • Used a bay designated for people with children or the disabled

That said, private landowners must erect signs that explain the Terms and Conditions of using their car parks. If there aren’t clear and visible signs, you can’t be in breach of the contract. Therefore, you can’t be given a Parking Charge Notice.

Appealing a Parking Charge Notice

You can appeal a Parking Charge Notice and have the right to do so if:

  • You got the fine through the post over 14 days after you parked a vehicle on private land
  • You were parked correctly
  • No signs or road markings were visible
  • Your fine was over £100
  • You couldn’t return to your vehicle because you are disabled, have a young infant with you, or are pregnant. UK law does not allow for discrimination!
  • You were not driving when the fine was issued
  • No mandatory 10-minute grace period was given before getting the Parking Charge Notice
  • The fine was sent by post, but there weren’t any signs saying there was ANPR or CCTV in operation at the car park

What is a 10-mins grace period?

The Code of Practice clearly states that private landowners and operators must not issue a ticket without giving you a 10-minute grace period. All BPA members must follow this rule, and if they don’t, you can challenge the fine.

First, you should make an informal appeal to Parking Control Management, and they should look into the matter. The parking ticket should be cancelled if they find you are correct. Also, before making an appeal to an independent appeals association, you must file an informal appeal with the operator.

How do I appeal against Parking Control Management

When you believe the ticket was unfairly given, you have the right to challenge a Parking Charge Notice. The operator has its own internal appeals department, and an Accredited Trade Association member must follow the rules.

You can file an appeal against the charge online or by post. Always send an appeal by registered mail so you have confirmation that the operator received it.

If the operator rejects your appeal, you also have the right to appeal to the Independent Appeals Service (IAS). Moreover, the operator must abide by their decision if they uphold your appeal against the Parking Charge Notice.

Make sure you provide as much supporting evidence as possible when you contest a parking ticket. And keep copies of everything for your records.

Can I get CCJ for an unpaid private parking ticket?

Yes, if the operator takes you to court and wins, a judge will order you to pay the fine. When you ignore a County Court Judgement (CCJ), a record of it will remain on your credit history for six years!

A CCJ on your credit history will affect your ability to get future loans, credit cards or a mortgage!

Never ignore any court correspondence you receive. It’s best to deal with the problem because it won’t go away, and things can quickly get harder to settle. In short, it’s wiser to either pay the fine or appeal it by following the correct procedure.

Do You Have to Pay?

In many circumstances parking tickets are not enforceable.

It’s a bit sneaky, but last time I had a parking fine, I paid £5 for a trial to chat to an online solicitor.

Not only did I save £50 on solicitor fees, I also won my case and didn’t have to pay my £271 fine.

You can try it out now, just remember to cancel the trial once you’ve got your answer.

Parking Control Management – should I pay or appeal a Parking Charge Notice?

You should challenge a Parking Charge Notice if you didn’t break the rules or because the operator failed to follow the Code of Practice. It costs you nothing to file an informal appeal against an operator. Plus, it prevents them from taking further action until a decision is made.

However, suppose you were in the wrong and parked without paying or obeying the operator’s rules. In that case, you may be better off paying the fine and moving on!

Thanks for reading my post on Parking Control Management fines and whether you should pay or appeal. I hope the information provided helps you decide which course of action to take!

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