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Do Parking Tickets have to be Issued Within 14 days? 2022

Parking Tickets Have to Issued 14 Days

For free and impartial money advice and guidance, visit MoneyHelper, to help you make the most of your money.

Do parking tickets have to be issued within 14 days? The answer to this question depends on the type of parking ticket (council vs private) and some other details of your situation. Either way, you should be given a parking ticket in good time to have a fair chance of appealing against it. Learn more below. 

Do You Have to Pay?

In many circumstances parking tickets are not enforceable.

It’s a bit sneaky, but last time I had a parking fine, I paid £5 for a trial to chat to an online solicitor.

Not only did I save £50 on solicitor fees, I also won my case and didn’t have to pay my £271 fine.

You can try it out now, just remember to cancel the trial once you’ve got your answer.

What is a Penalty Charge Notice (PCN)?

A Penalty Charge Notice (PCN) is a fine issued by a council or transport group. The council mostly issues these fines for illegal parking, but they can also send you a PCN for some traffic offences, such as driving in a lane reserved for buses. You can also receive a PCN for not paying a road toll, such as the London Congestion Charge or the Dartford Crossing fee. 

PCN vs private parking ticket

A Penalty Charge Notice is not the same as a parking ticket for illegal parking on private land. When you park on private land, such as business premises or in supermarket car parks, you may have to pay. If you don’t pay or pay for long enough, a company could send you a private parking ticket, which is also referred to as a Parking Charge Notice.

A Parking Charge Notice can also be referred to as a “PCN”. For the sake of convenience, we’ll call council parking tickets as PCNs and private parking tickets as such. 

What happens if you don’t pay a PCN?

Your Penalty Charge Notice fine can be increased by 50% if you do not pay within 28 days. You’ll be sent a ‘charge certificate’ which gives you a further 14 days to pay but simultaneously increases your fine by 50%. So if your parking ticket was £80, it would now be £120. 

If you do not pay your increased fine within the additional 14 days, the council or transport group could get a court order that forces you to pay. And if you ignore the order, they could try to recover payment by using enforcement officers, more commonly known as bailiffs. 

When they use bailiffs you may have to pay their fees, which can be expensive. They’ll try to recover the money before visiting you are your home. If you don’t make a payment, they can try to repossess some of your valuables to clear the debt. 

How long can you be chased for a parking ticket?

You can be chased for a Penalty Charge Notice for many years before it potentially becomes legally unenforceable, i.e. too old to be collected. However, it is likely that the council parking ticket will be chased and collected much sooner. 

Does a Penalty Charge Notice have to be issued within 14 days?

A PCN should be issued within 28 days of the offence. However, if the council has to request your address from the DVLA to send the PCN and the DVLA are slow to respond, the time limit is significantly extended. The council must at least request your information from the DVLA within 14 days. 

Can you appeal against a PCN?

You can appeal against a PCN within 28 days after receiving it. You have to make an informal appeal if the PCN was left on your vehicle or handed to you in the street. But if the informal appeal is rejected, you can make a formal appeal known as a representation. A representation is required at first in all other circumstances. 

A representation is a letter describing why you believe the PCN should be cancelled. You might argue that you were actually parked legally or that the payment machine was broken. You’ll need to back up these claims with evidence, such as statements from other people or photos. 

If your representation is rejected by the council, you can take your appeal to an independent tribunal. The tribunal you have to use depends on your location. There are different tribunals for people living in:

  1. England and Wales (outside of London)
  2. England and Wales (inside of London)
  3. Scotland
  4. Northern Ireland 

What happens if you don’t pay a private parking ticket?

If you don’t pay a parking ticket you’ll be chased for the debt, and the company you owe could try to get a County Court Judgment (CCJ) against you, which makes you legally responsible to pay. Ignoring a CCJ can result in enforcement action, not limited to a charging order on your property or the use of bailiffs. 

Parking charge notice time limit

You should be asked to pay a private parking ticket within adequate time to give you a realistic chance to be able to appeal against it. The company should have notified you of the parking breach before you left the car park and have followed this up within two months. If they were not able to notify you in the car park, they have 14 days to retrieve your details from the DVLA and send you the parking ticket.

Do parking tickets have to be issued within 14 days? (Quick summary)

Private parking tickets should be sent to the motorist within 14 days of the offence if they were not notified of the parking offence at the time. On the other hand, council parking tickets should be sent to the motorist within 28 days of the offence. These time limits could be extended if the parking ticket issuer needs to source your address from the DVLA and they are slow to respond. 

Do You Have to Pay?

In many circumstances parking tickets are not enforceable.

It’s a bit sneaky, but last time I had a parking fine, I paid £5 for a trial to chat to an online solicitor.

Not only did I save £50 on solicitor fees, I also won my case and didn’t have to pay my £271 fine.

You can try it out now, just remember to cancel the trial once you’ve got your answer.

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