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Fixed Penalty Notice For Speeding

Speeding Fine Received after 14 Days – What to Do

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Scott
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Scott Nelson

Managing Director

MoneyNerd’s founder, Scott Nelson, has a decade of financial industry experience, including 6 years in FCA regulated loan and credit card companies. Troubled by a lack of conscience in the industry, he founded MoneyNerd to give genuine advice to those in debt and struggling financially.

Learn more about Scott
&
Janine
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Janine Marsh

Financial Expert

Janine Marsh is an award-winning presenter and a valuable member of the MoneyNerd team. With a wealth of experience as a financial expert, she's been featured on BBC Radio 4, BBC Local Radio, and BBC Five Live, and is a regular on Co-op Radio.

Learn more about Janine
· Feb 7th, 2024
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Speeding Fine Received after 14 Days

Did you receive your speeding fine after 14 days? Are you feeling confused about what to do next?

Don’t worry; you’ve come to the right place. Every month, over 130,000 people visit our website for advice about fines and parking tickets. 

In this easy-to-understand guide, we’ll explain:

  • What a Fixed Penalty Notice is.
  • If you need to pay this notice right away.
  • How to say you don’t agree with the notice.
  • Times when you might not need to pay.
  • What could happen if you choose not to pay.

Getting a speeding fine can be frustrating; some of us have been there too. But remember, we’re here to help you understand what to do if you get your speeding fine after 14 days.

Do You Have to Pay Speeding Fines?

In some circumstances, you might have a legitimate reason not to pay your speeding fine.

It’s a bit sneaky, but the last time I needed legal advice, I paid £5 for a trial to chat with an online solicitor called JustAnswer.

Not only did I save £50 on solicitor feeds, I also won my case and didn’t have to pay my £271 fine.

Chat below to get started with JustAnswer

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Punishments when you’re caught speeding

If you’re caught speeding in the UK, you could be:

  1. Given a verbal warning
  2. Given a fine
  3. Give a fine and have points added to your licence.
  4. Offered to attend a speed awareness course (and pay for it!)
  5. Summoned to court

You’ll only be summoned to court for excessive speeding or if you already have at least eight penalty points on your licence under the UK road safety regulations. The most common punishment is a speeding fine, with more than two million UK motorists receiving one yearly.

How much are speeding fines in the UK?

The most you can be fined for speeding in the UK is £2,500 on a motorway or £1,000 on other roads. Your fine amount will be determined by how much you were over the speed limit and your weekly income. 

Different “bands” and the speed limit breaches determine the exact amount you’re fined.  

For example, someone just a couple miles above the speed limit will be in Band A and fined between 25% and 75% of their weekly income (plus three penalty points). 

Whereas someone doing between 11mph and 20mph over the speed limit will be in Band B and fined between 75% and 125% of their weekly income (plus 4-6 penalty points or a short driving ban). 

Speeding Fine Calculator

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This is a guidance tool only and not an assessment. For accurate speeding fine figures, contact the issuing authority credit. Do not rely solely on this calculator’s results.

What is a Notice of Intended Prosecution?

A Notice of Intended Prosecution is sent to a registered vehicle owner when the vehicle they own has been identified as speeding or committing other motorist offences. These offences are usually caught on camera. 

The Notice of Intended Prosecution is a legal notice for traffic violations and comes before the actual speeding fine. It is used as a way for the vehicle owner to respond and declare who was driving the vehicle and actually committed the alleged motor offences UK.

Once the offending individual has been confirmed, the police will send a Fixed Penalty Notice to that person. This is to notify them how much they have been fined and if penalty points will be added to their license. They can accept this or allow the matter to go to court, where the fine can become bigger. 

It is important to remember that there is likely to be photographic evidence from the speed camera, so if you choose to go to court, you really need robust proof that you were not breaking the speed limit.

Successful Appeal Case Study

Situation

Initial Fine £100
Additional Fees £171
Total Fine £271

The Appeal Process

Scott used JustAnswer, online legal service to enhance his appeal. The trial of this cost him just £5.

Total Fine £271
Cost of legal advice £5

JustAnswer helped Scott craft the best appeal possible and he was able to win his case.

Scott’s fine was cancelled and he only paid £5 for the legal help.

Get legal help

In partnership with Just Answer.

What is the speeding ticket 14-day rule?

What is the speeding ticket 14-day rule? A speeding ticket (or NIP) must be sent to the vehicle with the purpose of being received by the registered owner within 14 days after the offence. If the ticket was issued or sent outside of the 14-day window, there is a possibility that the ticket could be cancelled. But this isn’t true for all cases.

For example, if the registered address is wrong or associated with a hire company, it may take longer than 14 days for the ticket to reach you. However, as long as the ticket was sent to the registered address in the appropriate time frame, it is still valid, regardless of how long it took to get to you.

What happens if I don’t receive a NIP after 14 days?

If you don’t receive a Notice of Intended Prosecution (NIP) after 14 days, you can no longer be prosecuted for the alleged offence. You won’t have to pay the fine and you won’t have to accept penalty points on your license. This is as long as the NIP was sent within the 14 days.

However, it’s important to remember that a NIP doesn’t have to be sent to the registered vehicle keeper if a police officer gave you a verbal warning and collected the required details. In these instances, you should expect a Fixed Penalty Notice (FPN) instead of a NIP.

Does NIP 14 days include weekends?

The NIP 14-day rule is based on calendar days and therefore does include weekends and public holidays

As per the Road Traffic Offenders Act (1998) Section One, the NIP must be sent, so it’s expected to arrive by the 14th day after the alleged speeding offence. Posting the NIP within 14 days but it not actually arriving until the 15th day or thereafter will break the rule, and you won’t have to accept a fine.

Getting the support of a Solicitor can take a huge weight off your mind.

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How long after a speeding offence can you be charged?

As such, you can only bear the consequences of speeding if you’re given an immediate verbal notice or the vehicle owner is issued a NIP within 14 days. The police know about this prosecution window, so endeavour to send the NIP to the registered vehicle keeper swiftly to keep within the legal timeframe for traffic offences.

Can I appeal my speeding fine?

You have the right to appeal a speeding ticket. But whether it’s worth it or not is another matter. A court may decide the police have enough evidence against you. The result? A relatively small speeding fine could be a lot more expensive.

Challenging traffic violations could be a gamble which is why many experts estimate that only a tiny percentage (1%) of speeding fines are challenged. Plus, only about half of the appeals succeed! It is also important to remember that there is likely to be a stack of photographic speeding camera evidence against you.

Possible impacts on insurance

If you are convicted of speeding and have points on your license, you can almost certainly expect to see your insurance premium rise. Not only that, but if you are a professional driver – taxi driver, HGV driver, courier etc -you may see other restrictions placed upon you by your employer or regulatory body.

Points last for three years on your license, and if you ‘tot up’ more than 12, you will find yourself with a ban. If you have held your license for two years or less, you can only get a maximum of six points before having to resit your theory and practical test.

» TAKE ACTION NOW: Get legal support from JustAnswer

Speeding fine received after 14 days (Quick recap)

The police have up to six months to issue you a speeding fine. But they can only fine you or add penalty points to your licence if they had previously sent a Notice of Intended Prosecution (NIP) to the registered vehicle owner. The NIP must have been received within 14 days from the date of the alleged speeding offence. 

So, what is the speeding ticket 14-day rule? If the NIP was received after 14 days, the offender cannot:

  1. Be fined for speeding.
  2. Be subject to penalty points
  3. Be summoned to court and prosecuted

Hire a Solicitor for less than a coffee.

If you’re thinking about appealing your speeding fine then getting some professional advice is a good idea.

Getting the support of a Solicitor can make your appeal much more likely to win.

For a £5 trial, Solicitors from JustAnswer can look at your case and help you create an airtight appeal.

Try it below

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In partnership with Just Answer.

The authors
Scott Nelson Profile Picture
Author
MoneyNerd’s founder, Scott Nelson, has a decade of financial industry experience, including 6 years in FCA regulated loan and credit card companies. Troubled by a lack of conscience in the industry, he founded MoneyNerd to give genuine advice to those in debt and struggling financially.
Janine Marsh Profile Picture
Appeals Expert
Janine Marsh is an award-winning presenter and a valuable member of the MoneyNerd team. With a wealth of experience as a financial expert, she's been featured on BBC Radio 4, BBC Local Radio, and BBC Five Live, and is a regular on Co-op Radio.
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How I successfully appealed my fine...

It’s a bit sneaky, but the last time I had a fine, I paid £5 for a trial of an online solicitor called JustAnswer.

They told me exactly how to appeal and win.

Not only did I save £50 on solicitor fees, I also won my case and didn’t have to pay the £271 fine!

Give them a try now.

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