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Speeding Fine Received after 14 Days – What to Do 2022

HomeCouncil FinesSpeeding Fine Received after 14 Days – What to Do 2022
speeding fine received after 14 days

Speeding fine received after 14 days – what does this mean for you? Read this guide to know your rights when receiving a Notice of Intended Prosecution after 14 days and all the caveats to the law. Knowing your rights could help you avoid paying a speeding fine. 

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Punishments when you’re caught speeding

If you’re caught speeding in the UK, you could be:

  1. Given a verbal warning
  2. Given a fine
  3. Given a fine and have points added to your license
  4. Offered to attend a speed awareness course (and pay for it!)
  5. Summoned to court

You’ll only be summoned to court for excessive speeding or if you already have at least eight penalty points on your license. The most common punishment is to receive a speeding fine, with more than two million UK motorists receiving them each year. 

How much are speeding fines in the UK?

The most you can be fined for speeding in the UK is £2,500 on a motorway or £1,000 on other roads. The exact amount your fined will be determined by how much you were over the speed limit and your weekly income. 

Different “bands” and the specifics of the incident determine the exact amount you’re fined.  

For example, someone just a couple miles above the speed limit will be in Band A and fined between 25% and 75% of their weekly income (plus three penalty points). 

Whereas someone doing between 11mph and 20mph over the speed limit will be in Band B and fined between 75% and 125% of their weekly income (plus 4-6 penalty points or a short driving ban). 

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What is a Notice of Intended Prosecution?

A Notice of Intended Prosecution is sent to a registered vehicle owner when the vehicle they own has been identified as speeding or committing other motorist offences. These offences are usually caught on camera. 

The Notice of Intended Prosecution comes before the actual speeding fine. It is used as a way for the vehicle owner to respond and declare who was driving the vehicle and actually committed the alleged offence.  

Once the offending individual has been confirmed, the police will send a Fixed Penalty Notice to that person. This is to notify them how much they have been fined and if penalty points will be added to their license. They can accept this or allow the matter to go to court where the fine can become bigger. 

Notice of Intended Prosecution (NIP) 14-day rule

When a vehicle is identified as speeding, a Notice of Intended Prosecution must be sent to the address of the registered vehicle owner unless a verbal notice is given by a police officer.

The NIP must be sent with the purpose of being received by the registered vehicle keeper within 14 days. It’s not enough for the NIP to be sent on the 14th day as this would certainly not arrive at the keeper’s address in time. 

What happens if I don’t receive a NIP after 14 days?

If you don’t receive a Notice of Intended Prosecution (NIP) after 14 days you can no longer be prosecuted for the alleged offence. You won’t have to pay the fine and you won’t have to accept penalty points on your license. 

However, it’s important to remember that a NIP doesn’t have to be sent to the registered vehicle keeper if a police officer gave you a verbal warning and collected the required details. In these instances, you should expect a Fixed Penalty Notice (FPN) instead of a NIP.

How long after a speeding offence can you be charged?

As such, you can only bear the consequences of speeding if you’re given an immediate verbal notice or the vehicle owner is issued a NIP within 14 days. The police know this so endeavour to send the NIP to the registered vehicle keeper swiftly. 

Does NIP 14 days include weekends?

The NIP 14-day rule is based on calendar days and therefore does include weekends and public holidays

As per the Road Traffic Offenders Act (1998) Section One, the NIP must be sent so it’s expected to arrive by the 14th day after the alleged speeding offence. Posting the NIP within 14 days but it not actually arriving until the 15th day or thereafter will break the rule and you won’t have to accept a fine.

Why you might not receive a NIP within 14 days

There are three reasons why you might not receive a NIP within 14 days. These are:

  1. You received a verbal warning instead and won’t receive a NIP
  1. You aren’t the registered vehicle keeper. In this case, the vehicle keeper will report that it wasn’t them driving the vehicle when the offence took place and will give them your information instead. You will then receive a Fixed Penalty Notice – or court summons if being prosecuted. 
  1. The police didn’t serve the NIP in time. This is more likely to happen if they sent the NIP just before the 14-day deadline but also before bank holiday weekends. 

When should a Fixed Penalty Notice be received?

As long as the Notice of Intended Prosecution is received by the vehicle owner within 14 days, the police then have up to six months to issue the Fixed Penalty Notice, i.e. the speeding ticket.

You’ll then have 28 days to accept the fine and potential penalty points. 

Speeding fine received after 14 days (Quick recap)

The police have up to six months to issue you with a speeding fine. But they can only fine you or add penalty points to your licence if they had previously sent a Notice of Intended Prosecution (NIP) to the registered vehicle owner. The NIP must have been received within 14 days since the date of the alleged speeding offence. 

If the NIP was received after 14 days, the offender cannot:

  1. Be fined for speeding
  2. Be subject to penalty points
  3. Be summoned to court and prosecuted

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