For free and impartial money advice and guidance, visit MoneyHelper, to help you make the most of your money.

Menu

DCBL Parking Fine – Should You Pay? 2022 Laws

dcbl parking fine

For free and impartial money advice and guidance, visit MoneyHelper, to help you make the most of your money.

Received a letter about a DCBL parking fine? This is a private parking fine you owe to a car park operator but is now being chased by DCBL. Before you assume it’s a scam or bin the letter, you need to hear this. 

Do You Have to Pay?

In many circumstances parking tickets are not enforceable.

It’s a bit sneaky, but last time I had a parking fine, I paid £5 for a trial to chat to an online solicitor.

Not only did I save £50 on solicitor fees, I also won my case and didn’t have to pay my £271 fine.

You can try it out now, just remember to cancel the trial once you’ve got your answer.

What is DCBL?

Direct Collection Bailiffs Limited (DCBL) is a debt collection company that provides services throughout the debt recovery process. They can assist with early-stage recovery by tracing debtors and sending reminders. But they are also enforcement officers (bailiffs!) who can enforce court orders to pay debts.

In fact, DCBL is one of the most famous bailiffs in the UK because they have been on TV and featured in a Netflix series. You may have seen them already on Can’t Pay? We’ll Take It Away.

Are DCBL legit?

DCBL are legitimate debt collectors and enforcement officers. They are fully authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority. If you receive a communication from DCBL, don’t ignore it even if you don’t agree with what they’re telling you. 

What type of debts does DCBL chase?

DCBL chases a wide variety of debts within a number of industries. They work for companies to collect debts from customers and other businesses. This may include unpaid credit cards and loans, utility bill arrears, council tax arrears, telecommunications debts and much more. They’re also known to chase unpaid private parking fines

DCBL reviews

DCBL reviews online follow a familiar pattern. Most of their clients are happy with the service because they’ve gotten their money back. Whereas those being chased are unhappy with how they’ve been treated. Take a look at some examples below:

“We would certainly recommend this company and if the occasion arises we will use them again. A quick, painless and professional service provided. Case settled and remittance made promptly.”

  • Anon (Trustpilot)

“Absolute scumbags… going after innocent vulnerable people over parking tickets they have paid for. Shame on you and your business clients.”

  • Dave L (Trustpilot)

DCBL parking fine debts

As mentioned earlier and noted in one of the reviews above, DCBL frequently chases unpaid private parking tickets. When the car park operator hasn’t convinced you to pay, they could hand over the debt recovery process to a debt collection group like DCBL. 

DCBL will send you a letter requesting that you pay the parking fine, and possibly extra fees. The letter will also suggest that the car park operator will take you to court if you don’t pay. However, it’s never known if this is a genuine legal outcome or just a threat to scare you into clearing the fine quickly.

If you have already lost in court and are ordered to pay a private parking ticket by a judge, DCBL bailiffs may contact you instead. They will send you a Notice of Enforcement letter, which states that you have seven days to pay – as directed by the court – or they will come to seize goods. 

Should you pay a DCBL parking fine?

You’re not obligated to pay a private parking fine unless a judge tells you to do so. But being taken to court can add more expense to the matter. Therefore, you should consider paying the DCBL parking fine if you have been contacted before court action. You may still be able to appeal the parking ticket instead, which is an option if you don’t agree with the parking ticket. 

You should absolutely pay the DCBL parking fine if you have already lost in court and have received a Notice of Enforcement. You’re already legally obligated to pay, and not doing so will only result in more expense and stress. 

What happens if you don’t pay a DCBL parking fine?

A number of scenarios could play out if you don’t pay a DCBL parking fine before any court action has taken place:

  1. You could be taken to court and eventually made to pay
  2. You could be continually contacted for payment, which can be stressful
  3. You could be left alone for a period and not have to pay – but then A and B could re-occur 

the following will happen if you don’t pay a DCBL parking fine after receiving a court order telling you to pay and don’t:

  1. DCBL will send you a Notice of Enforcement giving you seven days to pay. The Notice of Enforcement adds a £75 fee to the debt, and you’ll also have to pay this.
  2. DCBL bailiffs will come to your property after seven days to request full payment and their own fees. At least another £235 is added to the debt at this stage. Or they will attempt to seize goods to be stored and sold (which incurs more bailiff fees!). 
  3. DCBL may have to return to your property at a later date to recover assets, which adds even more fees to the debt. This will repeat until the debt has been cleared. 

Can bailiffs force entry for parking fines?

Bailiffs can never force entry into a property unless they’re recovering assets as part of a Controlled Goods Agreement. Even then, they must use a locksmith and not break into your home by kicking down doors. 

Bailiffs chasing parking fines will only access your home if you have left a door open or ajar. For this reason, you may want to communicate with them through an upstairs window. 

Can you appeal a DCBL parking fine instead?

If the private car park operator has already handed the debt collection process over to DCBL, it’s extremely likely that you’ve already run out of time to lodge an appeal. However, you may want to double-check this based on your own timeline. 

Do You Have to Pay?

In many circumstances parking tickets are not enforceable.

It’s a bit sneaky, but last time I had a parking fine, I paid £5 for a trial to chat to an online solicitor.

Not only did I save £50 on solicitor fees, I also won my case and didn’t have to pay my £271 fine.

You can try it out now, just remember to cancel the trial once you’ve got your answer.

Have a debt collector questions?

If you have further questions about dealing with debt collectors or bailiffs, head straight to our debt help page. It’s full of valuable information to help you stay calm and know your rights. Take a look today!

Share