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Do You Have to Pay Parking Eye Fines? 2022 Laws

have to pay parking eye fines

For free and impartial money advice and guidance, visit MoneyHelper, to help you make the most of your money.

Do you have to pay Parking Eye fines? Unfortunately, there isn’t a straight yes or no to this question. We get to the bottom of it here and answer related Parking Charge Notice questions. 

It’s time to see if you really have to pay!

Do You Have to Pay?

In many circumstances parking tickets are not enforceable.

It’s a bit sneaky, but last time I had a parking fine, I paid £5 for a trial to chat to an online solicitor.

Not only did I save £50 on solicitor fees, I also won my case and didn’t have to pay my £271 fine.

You can try it out now, just remember to cancel the trial once you’ve got your answer.

What is Parking Eye?

Parking Eye, also known as Parkingeye, is a car park management company. They offer technologies and solutions to private land and car park owners to manage their car park, make it more profitable and deter unauthorised parking. 

How do Parking Eye car parks work?

Parking Eye car parks work by providing the landowner with technologies or staff to manage their car park. 

For example, Parking Eye can provide ANPR, a special type of CCTV that monitors vehicles using the car park. These technologies can be used to deter and crackdown on unauthorised parking.

Can Parking Eye issue parking tickets?

Parking Eye can issue motorists with a parking ticket if they break the parking rules in their private car park. These parking tickets are officially called Parking Charge Notices and may be left on your car or sent to your home address. 

The latter is possible because the special CCTV detects number plates and then requests the registered vehicle owner’s information from the DVLA.

How much is a Parking Eye fine?

Parking Eye fines can be issued for a maximum of £50 in England and Wales (excl. London). Most fines are equal to this amount or a little more in London. 

The amount Parking Eye and similar companies could charge was slashed in half in 2022 through legislation changes. The previous private parking cap was fixed at £100.

Additionally, Parking Eye is forced to offer you a discount on the fine if you agree to pay in the first 14 days. The smallest discount they are allowed to offer is 40%, meaning some of their fines will only end up costing £30.

Do you have to pay private parking fines in the UK?

Your responsibility to pay private parking fines isn’t straightforward. On the one hand, these aren’t real penalties, but the company could potentially take you to court and a judge may request that you pay

The real question is how likely is it that the private company will take you to court? 

Do I have to pay Parking Eye?

Parking Eye is a private company, therefore you don’t initially or automatically have to pay their parking fines. But you might end up forced to pay if the company takes you to court and a judge sides with Parking Eye. 

Thus, there isn’t a straight answer to this question. 

Do you need to pay Parking Eye fines in Scotland?

Parking Eye fines in Scotland are the same as in other places. Although these aren’t real penalties like the parking fines handed out by the police or the council, they can become enforceable if Parking Eye takes you to court. So, you might have to pay them

What happens if you don’t pay Parking Eye tickets?

Anybody who ignores a Parking Eye ticket should expect to receive reminders and legal threats. Any threat of court action could be legitimate, but it could also be a tactic to try and get you to pay, especially when the amount you owe is small. 

Parking Eye might use the services of a debt collection agency to chase you for payment. Note that these companies are not bailiffs and don’t have any additional legal rights. 

Can Parking Eye give you a CCJ?

Parking Eye can take you to court and have an order put against you to pay the fine. If you don’t receive the court paperwork and reply, they could ask for a default CCJ against you. This is possible if you moved home recently. 

Parking Eye appeals process

Parking Eye allows you to appeal your Parking Charge Notice within 28 days. You must submit an appeal in writing, clearly explaining your reason for appealing with any evidence. You won’t need to pay the fine until a decision has been made on your appeal.

You can get more details on the process here

If Parking Eye rejects your appeal, you’re allowed to escalate it to independent appeal service. The service you must use in this case is called Parking on Private Land Appeals (POPLA). And Parking Eye must provide details on how to do so. 

Parking Eye fine – Should I pay or appeal?

Whereas appealing is free and could get you off the hook, paying could be less stressful and you’ll be able to take advantage of the 40% (minimum discount). The decision should only be made based on your preferences and the perceived strength of your appeal (and evidence!). 

Parking Eye 10 minutes grace period

The latest rules state that private car park operators must provide you with a 10 minute grace period to get to your car and leave the car park. This means that any Parking Charge Notice which is issued within the ten minutes after your paid-for parking runs out would be withdrawn. 

If applicable, you could use this as an excuse to appeal the parking fine. But there are other good excuses you can use as well. Read about them on our other parking fine guides! 

Do You Have to Pay?

In many circumstances parking tickets are not enforceable.

It’s a bit sneaky, but last time I had a parking fine, I paid £5 for a trial to chat to an online solicitor.

Not only did I save £50 on solicitor fees, I also won my case and didn’t have to pay my £271 fine.

You can try it out now, just remember to cancel the trial once you’ve got your answer.

Parking Eye fines aren’t considered real fines like a council parking ticket, but the company can still take you to court if you don’t pay. In the event that a judge decides you should pay, you’ll be given a court order to pay the money or face further (more expensive!) action.

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