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Parking Eye Appeal – Guide, Laws and FAQs 2022

parking-eye-appeal

For free and impartial money advice and guidance, visit MoneyHelper, to help you make the most of your money.

Are you wondering about the Parking Eye appeal process and the laws relating to Parking Charge Notices? You’re not alone! Knowing when to pay or appeal a fine you get on private land could save you money.

I delve into making a Parking Eye appeal and what to expect. Read on to find out more.

Do You Have to Pay?

In many circumstances parking tickets are not enforceable.

It’s a bit sneaky, but last time I had a parking fine, I paid £5 for a trial to chat to an online solicitor.

Not only did I save £50 on solicitor fees, I also won my case and didn’t have to pay my £271 fine.

You can try it out now, just remember to cancel the trial once you’ve got your answer.

Who is Parking Eye?

Parking Eye is a firm that provides parking solutions on private land for many landowners. They manage car parks for the healthcare sector, motorway services and retail outlets, to name but three of their clients.

The operator uses Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) technology and car park attendants in some locations. Parking Eye has the right to issue you with a fine if you are deemed to have broken their ‘rules’ when using a private car park.

The Parking Charge Notices are ‘invoices’ raised by the operator because you did not adhere to their Terms and Conditions. The fine could be attached to your windscreen, or you may get it in the post! 

Plus, the operator is a member of the British Parking Association (BPA). Therefore, they can get your home address by contacting the DVLA!

How much is the fine?

The fine can be up to £50 and no more if you get the Parking Eye ticket in England and Wales. But if it was issued in London, it may be as much as £80!

The amount could be reduced by 40% when you pay within 14 days rather than file a Parking Eye appeal. However, suppose you’re convinced the fine was given incorrectly. In that case, you have the right to appeal the penalty.

It costs you nothing when you file a Parking Eye appeal!

Is ParkingEye legally enforceable?

ParkingEye fines are only enforceable when you are ordered to pay the amount following a court hearing!

However, the fine could be cancelled when an operator does not follow the Code of Practice and issues a Parking Charge Notice. Also, an operator cannot start legal proceedings once you make an informal appeal.

But if you lose the appeal, Parking Eye could take you to court. The question is whether they would or not. Is Parking Eye appeal rejected? You have the right to file an appeal with an Independent Appeals Service (IAS) when this happens. This would be with POPLA.

Reasons for a Parking Eye appeal

There are various scenarios which could give you grounds to file a Parking Eye appeal. This includes the following:

  • The operator did not give you the mandatory10-minute grace period before issuing the ticket
  • You couldn’t get back to your vehicle in time for a valid reason
  • Your vehicle was broken down, and you were waiting for assistance
  • You had a young child with you
  • You are disabled or pregnant (UK law protects you from discrimination)

When you have a valid reason, the operator must take your appeal seriously and deal with it accordingly. However, when you don’t have a good reason for overstaying or parking incorrectly. In that case, you’re better off paying the fine!

And my advice is to pay it within 14 days of receiving the Parking Charge Notice. It will cost you a lot less when you do. But only if the fine is deserved. When it is not, then I suggest you challenge it!

The Parking Eye appeals process

You have 28 days to file a Parking Eye appeal. Plus, you must send the appeal in writing to the operator and provide the following:

  • A valid reason for the appeal against the Parking Charge Notice
  • Supporting evidence (if you have any)

Note: Don’t pay the fine while your appeal is being dealt with!

Parking Eye appeal rejected. What happens?

When the operator rejects your appeal against a fine, you have the right to take the matter to an Independent Appeals Service (IAS). In this instance, it would be the Parking on Private Land Appeals (POPLA).

Parking Eye must provide you with details on how to file an appeal with the service when they reject your initial appeal.

How long do you have to appeal to Popla?

You must file an appeal with POPLA in 28 days! So it’s essential you do it as soon as possible. The 28 days’ time limit begins from the date you get the operator’s ‘Notice of Rejection’.

If you miss the deadline, you must provide a valid reason why you couldn’t appeal any earlier.

What happens if I lose my Popla appeal?

If your appeal to POPLA is unsuccessful, you’ll have to pay the Parking Charge Notice. You’ll have 28 days to pay it from the date of the POPLA decision. Failure to pay in time could mean the operator sends your details to a debt collection agency

I recommend you don’t let this happen! Plus, there’s no further recourse to appeal the Parking Charge Notice once POPLA turns it down.

Thanks for reading the post about making a Parking Eye Appeal. I hope you find the information helpful and that it points you in the right direction!

Frequently Asked Questions

Does Popla charge a fee?
No. The service is free to motorists. When an appeal is successful, the operator must abide by the ruling. However, if your appeal fails, you’ll have to pay the Parking Charge Fine, or you could be taken to court.
Is Popla decision binding?
Yes, a POPLA appeal, if successful, is binding, and the operator must respect it. When Parking Eye rejects your appeal, they must provide details of how to lodge one with the Independent Appeals Service. If you are successful, the Parking Charge Notice will be cancelled!
How successful are appeals to Popla?
In their 2021 Annual Report, POPLA reported that 22,437 of the 61,214 appeals processed were upheld. In short, 37% of motorists had their Parking Charge Notices cancelled. So again, it shows how important it is to challenge a fine when you think it is unfair or incorrectly given.

Do You Have to Pay?

In many circumstances parking tickets are not enforceable.

It’s a bit sneaky, but last time I had a parking fine, I paid £5 for a trial to chat to an online solicitor.

Not only did I save £50 on solicitor fees, I also won my case and didn’t have to pay my £271 fine.

You can try it out now, just remember to cancel the trial once you’ve got your answer.

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