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Met Parking Services – Should you Pay or Appeal? 2022

met-parking-services

For free and impartial money advice and guidance, visit MoneyHelper, to help you make the most of your money.

Met Parking Services are authorised to hand our Parking Charge Notices to motorists by landowners who own the land. You shouldn’t automatically pay a fine you receive on private land. First, you should check that it was given correctly and that you deserved the penalty!

In short, if you’re wondering if you should pay or appeal the Parking Charge Notice, read on!

Do You Have to Pay?

In many circumstances parking tickets are not enforceable.

It’s a bit sneaky, but last time I had a parking fine, I paid £5 for a trial to chat to an online solicitor.

Not only did I save £50 on solicitor fees, I also won my case and didn’t have to pay my £271 fine.

You can try it out now, just remember to cancel the trial once you’ve got your answer.

Do you legally have to pay parking fines?

No, these fines are between you and the operator/landowner. Don’t automatically pay a Parking Charge Notice, but don’t ignore it either.

You can either challenge the fine or pay it because you deserved it. However, first, check if the fine is yours. Also that it was issued correctly. When you appeal, things come to a halt. The operator must deal with the appeal before they can do anything else.

This includes chasing you for the fine, sending your details to a debt collector, or starting legal proceedings!

A fine issued by a landowner/operator is an invoice you get because you failed to follow the rules when parking. Although a Parking Charge Notice looks like a Penalty Charge Notice, they are not the same.

Plus, Met Parking Services is a British Parking Association (BPA) member. Therefore, the operator must follow their guidelines when issuing parking tickets to motorists.

Note: Parking Charge Notices are not a criminal matter!

Why would I get a Parking Charge Notice? 

Met Parking Services could issue a Parking Charge Notice for a minor infringement. Or maybe you did not abide by their Terms and Conditions when you used the car park. Some of the most common reasons why the operator might issue you with a ticket include:

  • The car was not parked in a bay
  • You used a bay reserved for families with children and the disabled
  • No parking ticket was displayed in your vehicle
  • You got back to your car too late

All private companies that manage car parks must erect signs showing the rules for using them. Road markings must also be clearly visible. You must know about the Terms and Conditions for using a car park. When you don’t know the rules, you can’t ‘break’ them.

Can you appeal a fine on private land?

Yes, you can appeal a fine when you believe it’s unfair or wrongly given. But you have to prove it! When you can show Met Parking Services incorrectly issued a Parking Charge Notice, I recommend you challenge it.

Also, Met Parking Services must follow the British Parking Association’s guidelines. If they don’t, appealing the fine is your right!

You should appeal the parking fine if:

  • No rules were broken when you used the car park
  • You got the ticket in the post over 14 days after you parked at the location
  • Road markings and signs in the car park were unclear or not clearly visible
  • The machines in the car park were out of order
  • The parking fine you got was over £50 or £80 if you got it in London
  • You got back late because you are pregnant, disabled or have a young child with you (it is against the law to discriminate against anyone in the UK)
  • You were broken down and waiting for help
  • You got back to your car 5 minutes late but still got a parking ticket
  • The Parking Charge Notice was sent in the mail, but no signs saying there was surveillance were in the car park

If any of the excuses above apply to your case, I strongly suggest you appeal the parking ticket. 

You must challenge it within 28 days of receiving it!

Do I need to provide evidence?

You don’t have to provide evidence when you appeal a Parking Charge Notice. But it helps if you do.

Evidence could include things like:

  • Witness statements if anyone can verify your version of the story
  • Receipts and documentation could be a receipt from a vehicle recovery company and letters you got from Met Parking Services. You could need them if you appeal to the independent appeals service POPLA
  • Photos of where you were parked, the parking meter, payment machines, signs, road markings

What is a reasonable grace period for parking?

The operator should allow a 10-minute grace period for motorists returning to their vehicles. Met Parking Services is a BPA member and must adhere to their guidelines that allow you 10 minutes grace!

If you got the ticket and the operator did not allow you the grace period, I recommend you contest the fine. Met Parking Services must investigate, and while they do, no other action can be taken against you.

Note: Appealing a Parking Charge Notice costs nothing!

How do you contest a Met Parking Services fine?

You can contest a Met Parking Services fine on their website. The process is pretty straightforward. However, you must provide the following:

  • Ticket number
  • Car registration details

If you’ve lost the ticket, you can also find the information on the website. But you must provide the following info:

  • Where and when you were parked
  • Your car registration details

Once you appeal the parking ticket, everything grinds to a halt. In short, the operator has to deal with your appeal. They can’t begin legal proceedings or send in debt collectors until a decision is made!

What happens when Met Parking Services reject my appeal?

You can appeal to the Independent Appeals Service (IAS). POPLA deals with all Parking Charge Notice appeals. Plus, it’s free to use the service.

Do You Have to Pay?

In many circumstances parking tickets are not enforceable.

It’s a bit sneaky, but last time I had a parking fine, I paid £5 for a trial to chat to an online solicitor.

Not only did I save £50 on solicitor fees, I also won my case and didn’t have to pay my £271 fine.

You can try it out now, just remember to cancel the trial once you’ve got your answer.

Met Parking Services fine – should you appeal or pay?

My first advice is not to automatically pay the Parking Charge Notice. Next, make certain the fine is yours and given correctly. Here are the things you should check:

  • Is your registration on the Parking Charge Notice?
  • Was it given correctly? For example, did you get the 10-minute grace period?
  • Was the parking ticket issued in accordance with the BPA’s Code of Practice?

I hope the info in this post was helpful and that you can now know whether to appeal or pay a Met Parking Services fine.

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