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Wilson & Roe High Court Enforcement – Should you Pay? 2022

Wilson & Roe High Court

For free and impartial money advice and guidance, visit MoneyHelper, to help you make the most of your money.

Receiving a letter from Wilson & Roe High Court Enforcement can be quite scary. If you are the recipient of one of their letters, you probably have a lot of questions about who they are and what a high court enforcement officer can do to you. We discuss these bailiffs and if you should pay here. 

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There are several ways to deal with Wilson & Roe Enforcement and improve your finances.

Choosing the right way to tackle your debt could save you time and money, but the wrong one could cause even more harm.

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Who are Wilson & Roe High Court Enforcement?

Wilson & Roe High Court Enforcement are high court enforcement officers (HCEOs) helping private and commercial businesses recover debt and regain control of property. They have a long-established history dating back to the 1800s and have recently expanded on a Manchester office with locations now in Leeds, Bristol, Birmingham and London. 

You can find their official website here

Who do Wilson & Roe High Court Enforcement work for?

Wilson & Roe High Court Enforcement work for the high court to recover debts for a wide range of businesses, including:

  • Law firms
  • HMRC
  • Creditors
  • Local councils
  • Property agencies
  • Private landlords
  • Debt collection companies

These businesses must have already taken the debtor to the high court and won their case to be able to use HCEOs. 

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Are high court enforcement agents bailiffs?

A high court enforcement officer is a bailiff. High court enforcement agents and regular enforcement officers are both a type of bailiff, but high court enforcement officers work for the high court and have additional powers. As opposed to regular bailiff companies, which are working for private companies. 

The high court enforcement officer will be in possession of a Writ of Control, which is what gives them the authority to recover the debt on behalf of the high court. 

In either case, the debtor must have been issued with a court order to pay the debt before their services can be used. Bailiffs are one of the last stages within the debt chasing process. 

What is the difference between a bailiff and a High Court enforcement officer?

High Court enforcement officers recover debts that have been served with an order to be paid by the high court. They usually collect debts that have been issued with a County Court Judgment over the value of £600 and then transferred to the high court, as well as unpaid council tax, income tax, VAT, national insurance.

Unlike regular bailiffs, they work for the high court and are afforded some more legal powers. 

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What can a High Court enforcement officer do?

A high court enforcement officer (HCEO) can come to your home and request payment or seize control of goods, which will be sold at auction to clear the debt. They have greater legal powers than private bailiffs. For example, they can force entry into business premises to recover debts, even on the first visit when other options have been exhausted. 

Have you received a Wilson & Roe High Court Enforcement letter?

Wilson & Roe High Court Enforcement will send you a letter notifying you that they are coming to recover the debt on behalf of the high court. The letter is known as a Notice of Enforcement and will provide you with an opportunity to pay or expect a visit from their high court enforcement officers. You pay a fee of £75 for receiving a Notice of Enforcement

You should have already lost the case in the high court for the high court enforcement officers to send this letter. If the letter is in someone else’s name, you should speak to Wilson & Roe High Court Enforcement and let them know they have made a mistake. 

Should you pay Wilson & Roe High Court Enforcement?

You should pay the debt if Wilson & Roe High Court Enforcement have sent you a letter requesting payment. This means the debt case has already been to the high court and you have previously been ordered to pay. 

If the matter has not been to the high court or you are not aware of it, you should query the letter with the company and make sure it’s not a scam. 

What happens if you don’t pay Wilson & Roe High Court Enforcement?

If you don’t pay Wilson & Roe High Court Enforcement the money owed, their high court enforcement officers will come to your property. When they arrive, they will request full payment or attempt to take possession of your goods. These goods will be kept in storage – which you may need to pay for – and you’ll be given a further period with the opportunity to clear the debt. 

If you fail to clear the debt during this time, the goods will be sold at an auction to raise money. The money is then used to pay off your high court debt, with any remaining money or assets returned to you. 

If the HCEO process gets to this stage, further fees and charges will be added to your total debt. 

What if you can’t afford to pay Wilson & Roe HCEOs?

If you want to pay Wilson & Roe High Court Enforcement but cannot due to low income or financial insecurity, you might be able to agree on a payment plan with an upfront lump sum. This can be arranged after receiving the Notice of Enforcement to avoid further HCEO charges. 

Wilson & Roe High Court Enforcement may accept a payment plan when they visit your property, but they are not obligated to do so. 

Need help dealing with HCEOs?

For further assistance dealing with bailiffs or preparing for bailiffs to come to your house, speak with a UK debt charity and check out our dedicated bailiff guide. You’ll find lots of helpful information and support from these two resources. Get prepared for bailiffs now! 

Are you struggling with debt?

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Stop interest and charges from soaring

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